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Kirill Dmitriev
Kirill Dmitriev

NFPA 720: How to Install CO Detection and Warning Equipment for Free



- Benefits of installing CO detection and warning equipment- Risks of CO exposure and how to prevent it H2: How to access NFPA 720 for free online? - Steps to access NFPA codes and standards for free on NFPA website- Limitations and terms of use of free access- Advantages of purchasing NFPA products and services H2: How to install CO detection and warning equipment according to NFPA 720? - General requirements and recommendations for CO detection and warning equipment- Placement and spacing of CO detectors and alarms- Testing and maintenance of CO detection and warning equipment H2: How to comply with NFPA 720 and other relevant codes and standards? - Overview of NFPA 72 and its relation to NFPA 720- Other codes and standards that apply to CO detection and warning equipment- Tips for ensuring compliance and safety H1: Conclusion - Summary of main points- Call to action for readers # Article with HTML formatting What is NFPA 720 and why is it important?




NFPA 720 is a standard for the installation of carbon monoxide (CO) detection and warning equipment. It was developed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), a nonprofit organization that publishes codes and standards for fire, electrical, and life safety. NFPA 720 was withdrawn at the Annual 2018 revision cycle, and its requirements have been incorporated into NFPA 72, the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.




nfpa 720 free download



CO is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that can be produced by incomplete combustion of fuels such as natural gas, propane, wood, coal, oil, gasoline, or kerosene. CO can accumulate in enclosed or poorly ventilated spaces, such as homes, garages, basements, or vehicles. CO can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, weakness, chest pain, loss of consciousness, or death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 400 Americans die from unintentional CO poisoning every year.


Installing CO detection and warning equipment can help protect lives by alerting occupants of the presence of CO in sufficient time to allow them to escape or take other appropriate action. NFPA 720 provides guidance on how to select, install, test, and maintain CO detection and warning equipment in various types of occupancies, such as residential, commercial, industrial, or institutional buildings. NFPA 720 also covers the integration of CO detection and warning equipment with fire alarm systems.


How to access NFPA 720 for free online?




NFPA makes its codes and standards available online to the public for free as part of its commitment to enhancing public safety. To access NFPA 720 or any other code or standard for free online, you need to follow these steps:


  • Visit the NFPA website and select the code or standard you want to view from the list.



  • Select the link of the code/standard number (first column) on the specific page.



  • Click the "Free Access" button located under the title.



  • Use the drop-down menu to select an available edition.



  • Select the "view" button.



  • A new browser window will open displaying terms & conditions. Review and accept the agreement term to view the publication.



  • Use the "Table of Contents" or paging buttons to view chapters/sections.



  • Use the Zoom feature to increase/decrease the font size.



Please note: You will be asked to "sign-in" or create a profile to access NFPA codes/standards. This is a read-only sitedocuments cannot be downloaded or printed, because NFPA relies on the revenues from people who want to own their own copies to fund its mission. If you want to download or print NFPA codes/standards, you need to purchase them from NFPA or other authorized sources.


Purchasing NFPA products and services can provide you with many benefits, such as:


  • Access to the most current and updated versions of NFPA codes/standards.



  • Ability to bookmark, annotate, and share content with others.



  • Access to additional resources, such as handbooks, guides, training, and certification.



  • Support for NFPA's mission to reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards.



How to install CO detection and warning equipment according to NFPA 720?




NFPA 720 provides the minimum requirements for the installation of CO detection and warning equipment in various types of occupancies. The following are some of the general requirements and recommendations for CO detection and warning equipment:


  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be listed in accordance with UL 2034 or UL 2075, or other approved standards.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and NFPA 720.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be powered by a primary (main) or secondary (backup) power source, or both.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall provide audible and visual signals to alert occupants of CO presence.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be interconnected with other CO detection and warning equipment within the same dwelling unit or occupancy.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be compatible with fire alarm systems, if installed.



The placement and spacing of CO detectors and alarms depend on the type and layout of the occupancy, as well as the sources and pathways of CO. NFPA 720 provides specific guidance on where to locate CO detectors and alarms in different types of occupancies, such as:


Type of occupancyLocation of CO detectors and alarms


Residential- Outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.- On every occupiable level of a dwelling unit, including basements.- In other locations where required by applicable laws, codes, or standards.- In dwelling units that contain fuel-burning appliances or fireplaces.- In dwelling units that have attached garages.


Commercial- In occupiable spaces within buildings that contain fuel-burning appliances or fireplaces.- In occupiable spaces within buildings that have attached garages.- In occupiable spaces adjacent to parking garages.- In other locations where required by applicable laws, codes, or standards.


Industrial- In areas where CO-producing equipment is located.- In areas where CO can accumulate.- In areas where personnel can be exposed to CO.- In other locations where required by applicable laws, codes, or standards.


Institutional- In occupiable spaces within buildings that contain fuel-burning appliances or fireplaces.- In occupiable spaces within buildings that have attached garages.- In occupiable spaces adjacent to parking garages.- In sleeping rooms that have fuel-burning appliances or fireplaces.- In other locations where required by applicable laws, codes, or standards.


The testing and maintenance of CO detection and warning equipment are essential for ensuring their proper operation and performance. NFPA 720 provides specific guidance on how to test and maintain CO detection and warning equipment, such as:


  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be tested upon installation and at least annually thereafter.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be tested using methods specified by the manufacturer or NFPA 720.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be inspected periodically for damage, dirt, dust, or other conditions that could impair their operation.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall be cleaned, repaired, replaced, or recalibrated as needed.



  • CO detection and warning equipment shall have a service life of not less than six years from the date of manufacture.



How to comply with NFPA 720 and other relevant codes and standards?




NFPA 720 is not a standalone code or standard. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other codes and standards that apply to CO detection and warning equipment. The following are some of the codes and standards that are relevant to CO detection and warning equipment:


  • NFPA 72: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. This code covers the application, installation, location, performance, inspection, testing, and maintenance of fire alarm systems, fire warning equipment and emergency warning equipment, and their components.



  • NFPA 101: Life Safety Code. This code establishes minimum requirements for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of buildings and structures for safety to life from fire and other emergencies.



  • NFPA 1: Fire Code. This code regulates the safeguarding of life and property from fire and explosion hazards arising from the storage, handling, and use of hazardous materials and devices.



  • International Building Code (IBC). This code provides minimum requirements for the design and construction of buildings and structures for safety, health, accessibility, fire protection, structural stability, and energy efficiency.



  • International Fire Code (IFC). This code regulates the safeguarding of life and property from fire and explosion hazards arising from the storage, handling, and use of hazardous materials and devices.



  • International Residential Code (IRC). This code provides minimum requirements for the design and construction of one- and two-family dwellings and townhouses for safety, health, accessibility, fire protection, structural stability, and energy efficiency.



To comply with NFPA 720 and other relevant codes and standards, you need to follow these tips:


  • Consult with your local authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) to determine the applicable codes and standards for your project.



  • Review the codes and standards carefully to understand their requirements and recommendations.



  • Select CO detection and warning equipment that are listed and approved by recognized testing laboratories.



  • Install CO detection and warning equipment in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and NFPA 720.



  • Test and maintain CO detection and warning equipment regularly to ensure their proper operation and performance.



  • Educate yourself and others about the dangers of CO exposure and how to prevent it.



Conclusion




NFPA 720 is a standard for the installation of CO detection and warning equipment. It provides guidance on how to select, install, test, and maintain CO detection and warning equipment in various types of occupancies. NFPA 720 was withdrawn at the Annual 2018 revision cycle, and its requirements have been incorporated into NFPA 72. NFPA makes its codes and standards available online to the public for free as part of its commitment to enhancing public safety. However, if you want to download or print NFPA codes/standards, you need to purchase them from NFPA or other authorized sources. NFPA 720 is not a standalone code or standard. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other codes and standards that apply to CO detection and warning equipment. To comply with NFPA 720 and other relevant codes and standards, you need to consult with your local AHJ, review the codes/standards carefully, select approved CO detection/warning equipment, install them properly, test/maintain them regularly, and educate yourself/others about CO safety.


CO is a deadly gas that can be produced by incomplete combustion of fuels. CO can cause serious health effects or death if inhaled. Installing CO detection/warning equipment can help protect lives by alerting occupants of the presence of CO in sufficient time to allow them to escape or take other appropriate action. Therefore, it is important to follow NFPA 720 and other relevant codes/standards when installing CO detection/warning equipment in your home or workplace.


FAQs




  • What are the symptoms of CO poisoning?CO poisoning can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, weakness, chest pain, loss of consciousness, or death. The symptoms may vary depending on the level of exposure, duration of exposure, health condition of the person exposed, or other factors. If you suspect CO poisoning, you should immediately move to fresh air and call 911 or seek medical attention.



  • What are the sources of CO?CO can be produced by incomplete combustion of fuels such as natural gas, propane, wood, coal, oil, gasoline, or kerosene. Common sources of CO include furnaces, boilers, water heaters, fireplaces, stoves, ovens, grills, generators, vehicles, or other devices that burn fuel.



  • How can I prevent CO exposure?You can prevent CO exposure by following these tips:- Install CO detection/warning equipment in accordance with NFPA 720 and other relevant codes/standards.- Test and maintain CO detection/warning equipment regularly to ensure their proper operation and performance.- Follow the manufacturer's instructions and safety precautions when using fuel-burning appliances or devices.- Ventilate fuel-burning appliances or devices properly to avoid CO accumulation.- Never use fuel-burning appliances or devices indoors or in enclosed or poorly ventilated spaces.- Never leave a vehicle running in a garage or near a building.- Never use a generator indoors or near a building.- Never burn charcoal indoors or near a building.



  • What should I do if my CO detector/alarm goes off?If your CO detector/alarm goes off, you should follow these steps:- Immediately move to fresh air and call 911 or seek medical attention if you have symptoms of CO poisoning.- If you do not have symptoms of CO poisoning, check the battery and test the CO detector/alarm to make sure it is working properly.- If the CO detector/alarm is working properly and still goes off, evacuate the building and call your local fire department or gas company to inspect the source of CO.- Do not re-enter the building until the source of CO is identified and fixed.



  • Where can I find more information about NFPA 720 and other codes/standards?You can find more information about NFPA 720 and other codes/standards on the NFPA website. You can also contact NFPA customer service at 1-800-344-3555 or custserv@nfpa.org.



  • Where can I buy NFPA products and services?You can buy NFPA products and services on the NFPA catalog. You can also contact NFPA customer service at 1-800-344-3555 or custserv@nfpa.org.



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